VINTAGE FLOOR AND TABLE LIGHTING

Large Format Speed Graphic  – The Press Corp Camera

Manufactured in Rochester, NY 1912 to 1973. This camera was mostly owned by the press photographers and professional photographers.

Each of these cameras are responsible for hundreds or thousands of photographs printed in newspapers and magazines around the world. Joe Rosenthal took “Flag Raising on Iwo Jima” with this camera.

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Rosie Vintage Speed Graphic Camera Floor Light, The Press Corp Camera with a lamp shade in the Rosie store.
Up close view of the Rosie Vintage Speed Graphic Camera Floor Light, The Press Corp Camera with a lamp shade.
Back view of the Rosie Vintage Speed Graphic Camera Floor Light, The Press Corp Camera with a lamp shade.

Paillard-Bolex H16 16mm Movie Camera – Hollywood’s Favorite

First released in 1935. Directors such as Steven Spielberg, David Lynch, Terry Gilliam, Will Vinton, Stan Brakhage, Maya Deren, and Spike Lee all began their careers shooting on Bolex Cameras. It’s still used in film schools today.

It was made in Switzerland featuring spring wound clockwork drive from1935 to 1971. The cameras were expensive and considered the best equipment for personal film and movie making.

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Rosie Vintage Bolex-H16 Movie Camera Floor Light. Hollywood's camera with lamp shade in the Rosie store.
Side view showing Rosie badge of Rosie Vintage Bolex-H16 Movie Camera Floor Light. Hollywood's camera.
Long view of Rosie Vintage Bolex-H16 Movie Camera Floor Light. Hollywood's camera with lamp shade in front of display in Rosie's store.

Kodak Kodascope 16mm Projector

Rosie Vintage KodaScope Table Light, with a lamp shade on a buffet table.
Back side view of Rosie Vintage KodaScope Table Light, with a lamp shade on a cherry table.
Close up view of Rosie Vintage KodaScope Table Light, with a lamp shade on a cherry table.

Keystone R-8 Projector

The iconic Keystone R8 Projector was revolutionary. It made threading 8mm film easier, all the Bakelite controls were built into the body, and it utilized a 500-watt bulb capable of projecting a 10-foot-wide picture frame. This projector also featured special designed gearing and shutter mechanism that made for crisper images.

At less than $100, many middle-class families invested in Keystone and created home movies in mass.

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